The Surveyors’ Construction Handbook

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The Surveyors’ Construction Handbook


The Surveyors’ Construction Handbook Contents (12/03) Page 1
CONTENTS
Foreword
Acknowledgements
List of Abbreviations
Introduction 1
A        Aim and Scope of this Handbook 1
B        Arrangement of Content 1
C        Status of Content 2
D        Currency of References 3
E        Invitation 3
F         Subscription Service 3
Part 1: The Client
Section 1.1: The Client’s Requirements and Roles 1
1.1.1  Establishing the Client’s Objectives 1
1.1.2  The Role for Independent Advice 3
1.1.3  Project Brief 3
1.1.4  The Client’s Role 4
1.1.5  The Client’s Responsibilities 6
1.1.6  Appointment of Project Manager (where appropriate) 8
1.1.7  Appointment of Consultants 8
1.1.8  Appointment of Constructors 9
Appendix A: Further Reading 1
Section 1.2: Value Engineering 1
Introduction 1
1.2.1  Why Value Engineering? 2
1.2.2  Applicability 2
1.2.3  At What Stage Should Value Engineering be Carried Out? 3
1.2.4  Who Should Carry Out Value Engineering? 4
1.2.5  How Long Should It Last? 5
1.2.6  Preparing for a Value Engineering Workshop 5
1.2.7  Functional Analysis of Design Relative to the Client’s
Requirements 5
1.2.8  Pricing the FAST Diagram 8
1.2.9  Presenting a Design Solution to a Value Engineering Workshop    8
1.2.10 The Workshop 8
1.2.11 Assessing the Value of the Workshop 9
1.2.12 Implementing the Results 10
1.2.13 Feedback from Post-Occupancy Evaluation 10
Appendix A: Health Centre Value Tree 1
Appendix B: Typical Example of a Value Engineering Process 1
Appendix C: Further Reading 1Page 2 Contents (12/03) The Surveyors’ Construction Handbook
Part 2: Construction Design and Economics
Section 2.1: Pre-contract Cost Planning and Cost Management 1
Introduction 1
2.1.1  Pre-contract Cost Planning and Cost Management 2
2.1.2  Preliminary Cost Studies and Feasibility Studies 4
2.1.3  Budget 4
2.1.4  The Cost Plan at Outline Proposals Stage 8
2.1.5  The Cost Plan at Scheme Design Stage 11
2.1.6  Cost Checking 13
2.1.7  Action after Receipt of Tenders 14
Appendix A: Sources of Cost Information 1
Appendix B: Format of Budget and Cost Plans 1
Appendix C: Element Unit Quantities Generation for Hypothetical
Buildings 1
Appendix D: Further Reading 1
Section 2.2: Life Cycle Costing 1
Introduction 1
2.2.1  The Client Context 1
2.2.2  The Life Cycle Costing Calculation 5
2.2.3  Tax Allowances, Incentives and Business Rates 10
2.2.4  Data Sources 14
2.2.5  Worked Examples 15
Appendix A: Residual Values 1
Appendix B: Obsolescence 1
Appendix C: Costs And Values 1
Appendix D: Glossary of Terms for Taxation 1
Appendix E: Examples of Items of Expenditure Likely to Attract
Taxation Allowances 1
Appendix F: Further Reading 1
Section 2.3: Elements for Buildings 1
Introduction 1
2.3.1  Elements 1
2.3.2  Elemental Cost Analysis 1
2.3.3  Other Uses 2
Appendix A: BCIS Standard Elements 1
Section 2.4: Design and Build - Guidance for Employer’s Agents 1
Introduction 1
2.4.1  Background 2
2.4.2  Contract Documentation 3
2.4.3  Additional Services 3
2.4.4  Employer’s Requirements and Contractor’s Proposals
(including contract sum analysis) 5
2.4.5  Design and Build Variants 6
2.4.6  Novation 8
Appendix A: Potential Services Associated with the Role
of Employer’s Agent 1
Appendix B: Employer’s Requirements/Contractor’s Proposal Checklist    1The Surveyors’ Construction Handbook Contents (12/03) Page 3
Section 2.5: The Chartered Surveyor as Lead Consultant  1
Introduction 1
2.5.1  Definitions: The Difference Between a Project Manager and
Lead Consultant 1
2.5.2  Benefits of Appointing a Chartered Surveyor as Lead Consultant  2
2.5.3  Issues to Consider before Undertaking the Role 3
2.5.4  Schedule of Lead Consultant Duties 3
Section 2.6 Defining Sustainable Construction 1
Introduction 1
2.6.1  Technology Swaps 2
2.6.2  How Can the Environment and Sustainability be Valued? 3
2.6.3  How Does This Effect the Construction Industry? 4
2.6.4  Green Building Materials 7
2.6.5  Whole Building Sustainability 8
2.6.6  The Government Line 9
2.6.7  What Might the Future Hold 11
Appendix A: Embodied Energy Content of Building Material 1
Appendix B: Useful Addresses 1
Part 3: Construction Planning and Procurement
Section 3.1: Developing an Appropriate Building Procurement Strategy 1
Introduction 1
3.1.1  The Client’s Role 2
3.1.2  Procurement Strategy 12
3.1.3  Selection of Most Appropriate Procurement Strategy 25
3.1.4  Implementation 29
Appendix A: Procurement Options 1
Section 3.2: Building Services Procurement 1
Introduction 1
3.2.1  Appointing the Building Services Designer 3
3.2.2  Design Coordination 11
3.2.3  Appointing a Building Services Contractor 19
3.2.4  Tender Documents 34
Appendix A: Typical Example 1
Part 4: Construction Administration and Management
Section 4.1: The Problems of Practical Completion 1
Introduction  1
4.1.1  What Happens in Practice 1
4.1.2  Standard Form Approaches 3
4.1.3  Effects of Practical Completion 13
4.1.4  Methods for Dealing with Practical Completion 14
4.1.5  Definitions 16
4.1.6  Subsidiary Issues 20
Appendix A: General Objectives to be Achieved at Practical
Completion for Small to Medium-sized Building Projects 1
Appendix B: Table of Cases 1
Appendix C: Further Reading 1Page 4 Contents (12/03) The Surveyors’ Construction Handbook
Section 4.2: Ascertaining the Amount of Loss and
Expense Incurred in Building Projects 1
Introduction 1
4.2.1  General Principles 1
4.2.2  Definitions 4
4.2.3  Entitlement 4
4.2.4  Ascertainment 7
4.2.5  Admissible Items 9
4.2.6  Inadmissible Items 13
Appendix A: Ascertaining the Cost of Running a Site 1
Appendix B: Disruption 1
Appendix C: Ascertaining the Cost of Head Office Overheads 1
Appendix D: Checklist of Items for which Loss and/or Expense are
Allowed 1
Appendix E: Checklist of Steps Required when Considering
Submissions by Contractor 1
Appendix F: Further Reading 1
Section 4.3: The Management of Risk 1
Introduction 1
4.3.1  Definitions 2
4.3.2  The Rationale for Risk Management in the Construction Process    2
4.3.3  The Risk Management Process 5
4.3.4  Summary 14
Appendix A: Further Reading 1
Section 4.4: Valuations for Interim Certificates 1
Introduction 1
4.4.1  Valuations 1
4.4.2  Assumptions 2
4.4.3  Valuation Under a JCT Contract: Background 3
4.4.4  Recommended Action at the Start of a Contract 4
4.4.5  Communications 5
4.4.6  Approach 6
4.4.7  Content of a Valuation 8
4.4.8  Administration 15
4.4.9  Special Situations 16
4.4.10 Other Contract Terms (relative to valuations) 17
4.4.11 Valuations Under Other Forms of Contract 18
Appendix A: Further Reading 1
Appendix B: JCT Definition of ‘Reasonable Proof’ 1
Appendix C: Example of Priced Activity Schedule 1
Section 4.5: Extension of Time 1
Introduction 1
4.5.1  Extension of Time Clauses 2
4.5.2  Assumptions 2
4.5.3  Extension of Time Under a JCT Contract 3
4.5.4  Notice by the Contractor of Delay to Progress 4
4.5.5  The Award of an Extension of Time during the Contract
Period and Before the Completion Date 5
4.5.6  The Award of an Extension of Time after the Completion Date      6
4.5.7  Relevant Events 7
4.5.8  Concurrent Delays 12
4.5.9  Consequential Entitlement 13The Surveyors’ Construction Handbook Contents (12/03) Page 5
4.5.10 Administration 13
4.5.11 Extension of Time under an ICE Contract 14
4.5.12 Extension of Time under a GC Works Contract 14
Appendix A: Further Reading 1
Part 5: Additional Guidance and Information
Section 5.1: Surveying Safely 1
Section 5.2: Construction (Design and Management) Information 1
5.2.1  Schedule of Sources of Useful CDM Information 2
Section 5.3: Built environment group roles and information 1
Section 5.4: Building Cost Information Service 1
5.4.3  BCIS Online 1
5.4.4  Other BCIS Publications and Services 2
5.4.5  Further details 4
Section 5.5: Building Occupancy Cost Information (BMI) 1
5.5.2  BMI Quarterly Cost Briefing 1
5.5.3  Building Maintenance Price Book 1
5.5.4  Special Reports for Benchmarking 2
5.5.5  News, Digests and Reports 2
Section 5.6: Electronic document storage – legal admissibility 1
Introduction 1
5.6.1  Code of Practice – DISC PD 0008: 1999  2
5.6.2  Weight of evidence and document destruction 3
5.6.3  Authenticity 3
5.6.4  Photocopies, microfilm and image processing 4
5.6.5  Document storage 4
5.6.6  Storage and access procedures 5
5.6.7  Format of the Code of Practice 6
5.6.8  Conclusion 20
Appendix A: Specimen form for recording scanning information 1
Appendix B: Specimen form for recording retrieval 1
Appendix C: References 1
Index 1The Surveyors’ Construction Handbook Abbreviations (10/02) Page 1
LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
ABE Association of Building Engineers
ABI Association of British Insurers
ACA Association of Consultant Architects
ACE Association of Consulting Engineers
AQL Acceptable quality level
BCIS Building Cost Information Service
BEC Building Employers’ Confederation
BMI Building Maintenance Information
BRE Building Research Establishment
BRECSU Building Research Energy Conservation Support Unit
BREEAM Building Research Establishment Environmental
Assessment Method
BSI Building Standards’ Institution
BSRIA Building Services Research and Information Association
BWIC Builder’s Work in Connection
CA Contract Administrator
CAWS Common Arrangement of Works Section for Building
Works
CDM Construction (Design and Management)
CD-R Compact disc recordable
CECA Civil Engineering Contractors’ Association
CIB Construction Industry Board
CIBSE Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers
CIC Construction Industry Council
CIRIA Construction Industry Research and Information
Association
CITES Control in Trade of Endangered Species
CCT Compulsory Competitive Tendering
CSM Chartered Surveyors Monthly
DBFO Design Build Fund and Operate
DoE Department of the Environment (now known as the
DETR)
DETR Department of the Environment, Transport and the
Regions (formerly the DoE)
DMS Document Management System
DOM Domestic Sub-Contract
EC European Commission
EU European Union
FAST Functional Analysis Systems Technique
FCEC Federation of Civil Engineering Contractors
GNP Gross National Product
HBF House Builders’ Federation
HMSO Her Majesty’s Stationery Office (now known as
The Stationery Office)
HSE Health and Safety Executive
IChemE Institution of Chemical Engineers
ICE Institution of Civil Engineers
IDMA Information and Document Management AssociationIFC Intermediage Form of Contract
JCT Joint Contracts Tribunal
LCC Life Cycle Costing
LQ Limiting quality
M & E Mechanical and Electrical
MERA Multiple Estimate Risk Anaylsis
MW Minor Works
NEC New Engineering Contract
NEDO National Economics Development Office
NJCC National Joint Consultative Committee for Building
NSC Nominated Sub-Contract
OMR Optical Mark Reading
PFI Private Finance Initiative
PSA Property Services Agency
RIBA Royal Institute of British Architects
RICS Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors
VAT Value Added Tax
WCD With Contractor’s Design
WORM Write-Once-Read-Many
WRC Water Research Centre


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